for KCT adn Sunny

o mai darlin ai wil hold yoo
az teh litez begin tu fayd
tayk cumfurt in owr closeness
adn do nott be afrayd
yoo noe ai’d neber hurt yoo
after awl taht weev been thru
wot ai haz to do nao
ai iz doin it for yoo
yoo noe hao deep mai luv iz
so ignor it wen ai crai
adn let me cling on tu yoo
az we haz tu sae gudbai

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17 Comments

  1. Adaein3

     /  February 19, 2012

    Beautiful, Sunovawot. Been there so many times in the past 50 years.

    Reply
  2. damommza

     /  February 20, 2012

    How did I miss this? What a beautiful tribute to Sunny.. According to KCT’s FB page, Sunny is still hanging on and KCT is with Sunny and her other cat Pyewacket is there too, helping him to the bridge when the time comes.

    Reply
    • Thank you, though I do sometimes wonder if people think I am hijacking their grief for my poetry. I don’t think I am, but it is open to that interpretation.

      Reply
      • damommza

         /  February 20, 2012

        When Puccini wrote Madam Butterfly, one of the most heart-wrenching and emotional operas ever written, it wasn’t from personal experience at all. The singer who sings Butterfly’s “Con onor muore” (To die with honor) has never had this experience yet it elicits very strong emotions in the listener. That is what an artist does. It allows the viewer to experience pain/love/sorrow/joy etc through the words and the pictures that the artists creates, even if the artist has never experienced it. Your poetry allows people to communicate their feelings as well as experience emotions they might not have had an opportunity to. That’s what a good artist does. So, whether you have experienced what you write about is unimportant. It’s how the reader feels and your poetry really has found a place in many hearts. šŸ˜€

        Reply
        • The point I was making wasn’t reallly whether I had suffered loss and grief but more about the way I tie poems into particular people and their experiences, as with this one, though I wrote in direct response to reading KCT’s post on the Cryer, do
          other people feel that I’m feeding on someone’s genuine grief. The real question should perhaps be – should I anonymise my poetry, giving it instead a generic title.

          Reply
          • damommza

             /  February 20, 2012

            I think much of the beauty of the poems is that you DO personalize them. It makes it much more precious for the person who is experiencing the loss and for the reader, it ties them more cloesly to the feelings of the person the poem is for. So, in a word, no.

            Reply
            • damommza

               /  February 20, 2012

              ..and you need to add a “spellcheck” to this blog..if only for me… šŸ˜€ šŸ˜†

              Reply
            • Thank you, until someone comes up with an alternative argument I like I will take your answer as my guide šŸ˜€

              Reply
  3. Adaein3

     /  February 20, 2012

    I’m not thinking that. Someone like myself cannot put the meaning into words and that makes me feel lost at times, at times when one is already LOST.

    Reply
    • If my words can help someone express things they have difficult saying on their own, that is more than I ever set out to do šŸ™‚

      Reply
  4. damommza

     /  February 20, 2012

    …and Adaein3 and I posted the same thing at the exact same time. šŸ˜€

    Reply
  5. Yeah, yeah, I agree with damommza and Adaein3… I don’t view it as “hijacking” at all. I see it as a way to honor the pain and loss the people are suffering, and a tribute to the pet that’s crossing the Bridge. What they’re going through touches your heart, and your heart translates the feelings into words. It’s organic, natural, so very human, and beautiful in its simplicity.

    Reply
    • Thank you, it is good to have another opinion, and I do worry about giving offence, so you make me feel a little more comfortable. šŸ™‚

      Reply

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