bang-o

I met a scrivener on the way
and he asked me for my name-o
then he gave me a ride to the other side
for to me it’s all the same-o
and I prinked and I pronked and paddled my boat
floating down the stream-o
nothing may be what I think I see
in this frabjous dream-o
and I look to my plans but they’re all gone agley
and the bells no longer ring-o
a penny to a pound that I’ll stand my ground
while the ladies bid me sing-o
and I’ll gently take your hand in mine
and we’ll commence to twirl-o
for I tell you true that I’ll love you too
if you’ll only be my girl-o
so stagger down swagger down round the way
I’ve come to see them hang-o
and we’ll all have fun in the midnight sun
’til the light goes out with a bang-o

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5 Comments

  1. damommza

     /  July 14, 2012

    Oh My, Oh My, Oh My-O, Once you told me the defintions, it made more sense-O! πŸ˜€
    and I do like it! πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€

    Reply
    • Thank you πŸ˜€ but it isn’t supposed to make sense, hence the new tag “”NONSENSE” πŸ˜†

      Reply
      • damommza

         /  July 14, 2012

        Well, it made more sense than my original thought which was “WTF-O?” *snerk*

        Reply
        • πŸ˜† πŸ˜† πŸ˜†

          Reply
        • Actually, you made me think, in case anyone wants it I’ll add this

          Glossary

          A “scrivener” is a clerk or scribe.

          To “prink” is to make minor adjustments to your appearance

          To “pronk”, in antelopes, the way they jump without bending their legs.

          “Frabjous” is one of Lewis Carroll’s “portmanteau” words, probably a combination of fair, fabulous and joyous, meaning great or wonderful. It can be found in the poem “Jabberwocky” from the novel “Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There”

          ” “And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
          Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
          O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
          He chortled in his joy. ”

          And “agley” is a Scottish dialect word meaning awry, or wrong. Again from a poem, this time Robert Burns’s “To a Mouse”

          β€œThe best-laid schemes o’ mice an’ men
          Gang aft agley”

          gang aft agley = go often wrong

          Reply

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